Distinguished Service Medallion 2009

PAUL C. LAUTERBUR

Dr. Lauterbur joined the faculty of the University of Illinois in 1985. At the time of his death (March 2007) he was a Center for Advanced Study professor of Chemistry, Biophysics and Computational Biology and Bioengineering, as well as the Distinguished University Professor of Medical Information Sciences. He was a pioneer in the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Professor Lauterbur received the 2003 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his pioneering work in MRI, a prize he shared with Sir Peter Mansfield of the University of Nottingham in England. Professor Lauterbur's life and work exemplify the ideals of the University. Presented (in memoriam) to Professor Lauterbur's wife, Professor M. Joan Dawson, at Commencement on the Urbana-Champaign campus May 17, 2009.

ANTHONY J. LEGGETT

Dr. Leggett came to the University Illinois in 1983 when he became a faculty member. A world leader in the theory low-temperature physics, Sir Anthony Leggett (knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2004), the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Professor and Center for Advanced Study Professor of Physics, was awarded the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize in Physics. This award was shared with Alexei Abrikosov of Argonne National Laboratory and Vitaly Ginzburg of the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute in Moscow. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Russian Academy of Sciences, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society, the American Physical Society, and the American Institute of Physics. The Medallion was presented at the commencement on the Urbana-Champaign campus May 17, 2009.

CARL R. WOESE

Dr. Woese came to the University of Illinois in 1964. He is the Stanley O. Ikenberry Professor of Microbiology in the Center for Advanced Study. He is self-described as a molecular biologist turned evolutionist. Dr. Woese has received numerous accolades for his research including the 2003 Crafoord Prize in Biosciences (from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences), the National Medal of Science in 2000, the Leeuwenhoek Medal (from the Dutch Royal Academy of Science) in 1992, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Award in 1984. Presented at the Board of Trustees meeting in Urbana on September 23, 2010.

 

Board of Trustees Minutes
March 11, 2009

AWARD THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES' DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDALLION
TO PAUL C. LAUTERBUR, IN MEMORIAM

The late Dr. Paul C. Lauterbur is recommended for the Trustees' Distinguished Service Medallion. The Trustees' Distinguished Service Medallion was created to recognize individuals whose contribution to the growth and development of the University of Illinois, through extraordinary service or benefaction, has been of unusual significance.

Professor Lauterbur joined the faculty of the University of Illinois in 1985. At the time of his death in March 2007, he was a Center for Advanced Study Professor of Chemistry, Biophysics and Computational Biology and Bioengineering, as well as the Distinguished University Professor of Medical Information Sciences. He was a pioneer in the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Professor Lauterbur received the 2003 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his pioneering work in MRI, a prize he shared with Sir Peter Mansfield of the University of Nottingham in England.

By developing the use of nuclear magnetic resonance to create images of organs, joints, and other tissues in the human body, Professor Lauterbur established the MRI as perhaps the most significant medical diagnostic discovery of the 20th century, a discovery which has led to the saving of millions of lives. MRIs are not only effective, but they are also painless and have minimal side effects.

Among his many other awards are the National Academy of Sciences Award for Chemistry in Service to Society in 2001; the Kyoto Prize from the Inamori Foundation of Japan in recognition of his lifelong research accomplishments in advanced technology in 1994; the Order of Lincoln Medallion, the State of Illinois' highest award in 1992; the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia's Bower Award for Achievement in Science in 1990; the National Medal of Technology in 1988; the National Medal of Science in 1987; and the Albert Lasker Clinical Research Award in 1984. He was a member of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, the National Academy of Sciences, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society.

Professor Lauterbur's life and work exemplify the ideals of the University of Illinois--creativity, passion, tenacity, and, most importantly, commitment to mankind. Every time an MRI saves a life, Professor Lauterbur's influence lives on. He is sorely missed. He will always be remembered as a great scientist, a loyal colleague, and an exemplary human being.

To Paul C. Lauterbur, an extraordinary member of the University of Illinois family, the members of the Board of Trustees take pride and express great joy in presenting the Trustees' Distinguished Service Medallion.